Posts Tagged ‘Syria’

 

riots

Whenever I hear about the words peaceful protest and civil disobedience I think of tree hugging hippies that chain themselves to a tractor singing hymns. Answering violence with peace to me never seemed like a good idea. The only example I had to relate to the boycotting of the buses orchestrated by the NAACP and MLK Jr. Martin Luther King Jr was inspired Mahatma Gandhi’s philosophy Satyagraha, which means adherence to truth. I am not against civil disobedience as a whole. I just feel that this cannot be the only course of action when you face corrupt governments, dictators, rebel armies, extremists and other psychopaths who would scowl at any measure of trying to make peace without the use of lethal force.

riot

For the most part I get it, using brutality against brutality ends in more bloodshed. Honestly though, after peace talks have failed, strikes that don’t grab anyone’s attention and interventions between the two parties have not and most likely will not agree, it’s no longer a matter acting “civil.” Take for instance back in 2011, in an attempt to overthrow Hosni Mubarak’s 30 year reign, protestors formed mass non-violent demonstrations.  900 of the protestors were killed during these demonstrations.In a twist of irony the Egyptian army who would not open fire on the crowd, which signaled the turn around in the protest that lead to Mubarak’s downfall. The army was not eager to relinquish power and ended up throwing the protestors in jail. Another protest in Libya against the military might of Muammar al-Qaddafi was met with rebellion after the peaceful demonstrations did not work. The turmoil was finally resolved after nine months of bloodshed that resulted in a body count with a range from 10,000 to 30,000 people.

Also in Syria in 2011 the civil war between Alawites, Christians and Drutes  against Assad’s barbarous regime that claimed close to 5,000 citizens a month for 7 months. That’s around 35,000 lives taken and this was supposed to be peaceful protesting. Even in American history, peaceful resistance resulted in lives lost. The Native Americans were forced off their land at gunpoint. After the Supreme Court ruled that they do not own land back in 1823, Native Americans made attempts to stay on their land. President Andrew Jackson enacted The Indian Removal Act, after the Supreme Court (Worcester vs Georgia)upheld their right to stay on the land. Jackson’s motives were,based on his acquirement of gold during the gold rush era. 4,000 Native Americans lost their lives on the Trail of Tears and this shows that even political and judicial victories will never overrule greed, corruption and disregard of human life.

riotsss

The greatest example that comes to mind for my case, not to abide by civil disobedience is Mahatma Gandhi. He wanted India independence from Britain. He fought to end discrimination and the heavy taxes on his people. During Gandhi’s time in South Africa he witnessed and experience deep seeded racism against himself and his people. This inspired him to rally allies and gather for a rebellion. However, during 1947 riots against Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs resulted in over half a million deaths, which is suspected to be more according to Jens Arup Seip in addition to over 100,000 imprisoned. India eventually gained independence in 1947. The irony in his non violent protests is that Gandhi was not against violence in his own words he argued, Gandhi explains his philosophy and way of life in his autobiography The Story of My Experiments with Truth. Gandhi realized later that this level of nonviolence required incredible faith and courage, which he believed everyone did not possess. He therefore advised that everyone need not keep to nonviolence, especially if it were used as a cover for cowardice, saying, “where there is only a choice between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence.”

I’m not against peace talks, and strikes I just know the rebellious spirit of the founding fathers still lives in the American spirit. Oppressive forces in this country are the militarized police in place of the British Red Coats. One thing that we need to keep in mind is the insatiable thirst for blood that was inherited from the mother country. It is not in our nature to understand peaceful resolve in my opinion without it being a secondary thought. We fell heir to the predatorial, rapacious,avaricious manner of the plunderers of the villages of our authoritarian rulers. The ones who were more domineering than anyone else.

 

[contact-form][contact-field label='Name' type='name' id='cee0f2b0-69b6-4cb0-897f-480fb21e33b6' class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">/][contact-field label='Email' type='email' id='6ba50393-b3f8-40c8-aa6d-724532dd0b70' class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">/][contact-field label='Website' id='a9f7f8fc-a249-4e60-bfe1-5f65fd21e4e1' class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">/][contact-field label='Comment' type='textarea' id='1b1cedbb-19e9-476b-bfa6-efcfb02ccdcf' class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">/][/contact-form]

Amid Syria’s civil war, a 40-foot statue of Jesus rises on mountain top between front lines

 
 
 

(Samir El-Gadban, St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation/ Associated Press ) – This Oct. 14, 2013 photo provided by the St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation shows workers preparing to install a statue of Jesus on Mount Sednaya, Syria. In the midst of a civil war rife with sectarianism, a 12.3-meter (40-foot) tall, bronze statue of Jesus has gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three factions – Syrian forces, rebels and gunmen in the Christian town of Sednaya.

  • (Samir El-Gadban, St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation/ Associated Press ) - This Oct. 14, 2013 photo provided by the St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation shows workers preparing to install a statue of Jesus on Mount Sednaya, Syria. In the midst of a civil war rife with sectarianism, a 12.3-meter (40-foot) tall, bronze statue of Jesus has gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three factions - Syrian forces, rebels and gunmen in the Christian town of Sednaya.
  • (Samir El-Gadban, St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation/ Associated Press ) - This Oct. 14, 2013 photo provided by the St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation shows workers preparing to install a statue of Jesus on Mount Sednaya, Syria. In the midst of a civil war rife with sectarianism, a 12.3-meter (40-foot) tall, bronze statue of Jesus has gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three factions - Syrian forces, rebels and gunmen in the Christian town of Sednaya.
  • (Samir El-Gadban, St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation/ Associated Press ) - This Oct. 14, 2013 photo provided by the St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation shows workers preparing to install a statue of Jesus on Mount Sednaya, Syria. In the midst of a civil war rife with sectarianism, a 12.3-meter (40-foot) tall, bronze statue of Jesus has gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three factions - Syrian forces, rebels and gunmen in the Christian town of Sednaya.
  • (Samir El-Gadban, St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation/ Associated Press ) - This Oct. 14, 2013 photo provided by the St. Paul’s and St. George’s Foundation shows workers preparing to install a statue of Jesus on Mount Sednaya, Syria. In the midst of a civil war rife with sectarianism, a 12.3-meter (40-foot) tall, bronze statue of Jesus has gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three factions - Syrian forces, rebels and gunmen in the Christian town of Sednaya.
 
 

By Associated Press, Published: November 2

BEIRUT — In the midst of a conflict rife with sectarianism, a giant bronze statue of Jesus has gone up on a Syrian mountain, apparently under cover of a truce among three factions in the country’s civil war.

Jesus stands, arms outstretched, on the Cherubim mountain, overlooking a route pilgrims took from Constantinople to Jerusalem in ancient times. The statue is 12.3 meters (40 feet) tall and stands on a base that brings its height to 32 meters (105 feet), organizers of the project estimate.

People watch the waves batter into the sea wall of a marina in Brighton, south England, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. A major storm with hurricane force winds is lashing much of Britain, causing flooding and travel delays including the cancellation of roughly 130 flights at London's Heathrow Airport. Weather forecasters say it is one of the worst storms to hit Britain in years. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

 

 

Best news photos of the week

 

A quick way to catch up on the week’s news through our favorite photos.

Latest stories from Foreign

U.S. drone strike prompts rebuke, threats in Pakistan

U.S. drone strike prompts rebuke, threats in Pakistan

Tim Craig NOV 2

The day after the killing of Hakimullah Mehsud, the Pakistani Taliban moves to elect a new leader.

 
 

U.S. strike kills Pakistani Taliban chief

U.S. strike kills Pakistani Taliban chief

Tim Craig NOV 2

His death could cripple the group, but also threatens to “sabotage the peace talks’’ between the militants and Pakistan’s leaders.

 
 

World Digest: Nov. 2, 2013

NOV 2

2 French journalists killed in northern Mali; Iranian hard-liners unveil new ‘Death to America’ songs.

 
 

Britain asks if Conservatives can really be ‘green’

Britain asks if Conservatives can really be ‘green’

Anthony Faiola NOV 1

Environmentalists are alarmed by the rollback of ‘green taxes’ and other measures by the prime minister.

 
 

Giant Jesus statue is raised in midst of Syrian war

Giant Jesus statue is raised in midst of Syrian war

Diaa Hadid NOV 2

Christians and other minorities are all targets in the conflict, and the new statue’s safety is far from guaranteed.

 
 
Click here to subscribe.
 

That the statue made it to Syria and went up without incident on Oct. 14 is remarkable. The project took eight years and was set back by the civil war that followed the March 2011 uprising against President Bashar Assad.

Christians and other minorities are all targets in the conflict, and the statue’s safety is by no means guaranteed. It stands among villages where some fighters, linked to al-Qaida, have little sympathy for Christians.

So why put up a giant statue of Christ in the midst of such setbacks and so much danger?

Because “Jesus would have done it,” organizer Samir al-Ghadban quoted a Christian church leader as telling him.

The backers’ success in overcoming the obstacles shows the complexity of civil war, where sometimes despite the atrocities the warring parties can reach short-term truces.

Al-Ghadban said that the main armed groups in the area — Syrian government forces, rebels and the local militias of Sednaya, the Christian town near the statue site — halted fire while organizers set up the statue, without providing further details.

Rebels and government forces occasionally agree to cease-fires to allow the movement of goods. They typically do not admit to having truces because that would tacitly acknowledge their enemies.

It took three days to raise the statue. Photos provided by organizers show it being hauled in two pieces by farm tractors, then lifted into place by a crane. Smaller statues of Adam and Eve stand nearby.

The project, called “I Have Come to Save the World,” is run by the London-based St. Paul and St. George Foundation, which Al-Ghadban directs. It was previously named the Gavrilov Foundation, after a Russian businessman, Yuri Gavrilov.

Documents filed with Britain’s Charity Commission describe it as supporting “deserving projects in the field of science and animal welfare” in England and Russia, but the commission’s accounts show it spent less than 250 pounds ($400) in the last four years.

Al-Ghadban said most of the financing came from private donors, but did not supply further details.

Russians have been a driving force behind the project — not surprising given that the Kremlin is embattled Assad’s chief ally, and the Orthodox churches in Russia and Syria have close ties. Al-Ghadban, who spoke to The Associated Press from Moscow, is Syrian-Russian and lives in both countries.

Al-Ghadban said he began the project in 2005, hoping the statue would be an inspiration for Syria’s Christians. He said he was inspired by Rio de Janeiro’s towering Christ the Redeemer statue.

He commissioned an Armenian sculptor, but progress was slow. A series of his backers died, including Valentin Varennikov, a general who participated in the 1991 coup attempt against then President Mikhail Gorbachev. He later sought President Vladimir Putin’s backing for the statue project.

Varennikov died in 2009.

People watch the waves batter into the sea wall of a marina in Brighton, south England, Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. A major storm with hurricane force winds is lashing much of Britain, causing flooding and travel delays including the cancellation of roughly 130 flights at London's Heathrow Airport. Weather forecasters say it is one of the worst storms to hit Britain in years. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

 

 

Best news photos of the week

 

A quick way to catch up on the week’s news through our favorite photos.

Latest stories from Foreign

U.S. drone strike prompts rebuke, threats in Pakistan

U.S. drone strike prompts rebuke, threats in Pakistan

Tim Craig NOV 2

The day after the killing of Hakimullah Mehsud, the Pakistani Taliban moves to elect a new leader.

 
 

U.S. strike kills Pakistani Taliban chief

U.S. strike kills Pakistani Taliban chief

Tim Craig NOV 2

His death could cripple the group, but also threatens to “sabotage the peace talks’’ between the militants and Pakistan’s leaders.

 
 

World Digest: Nov. 2, 2013

NOV 2

2 French journalists killed in northern Mali; Iranian hard-liners unveil new ‘Death to America’ songs.

 
 

Britain asks if Conservatives can really be ‘green’

Britain asks if Conservatives can really be ‘green’

Anthony Faiola NOV 1

Environmentalists are alarmed by the rollback of ‘green taxes’ and other measures by the prime minister.

 
 

Giant Jesus statue is raised in midst of Syrian war

Giant Jesus statue is raised in midst of Syrian war

Diaa Hadid NOV 2

Christians and other minorities are all targets in the conflict, and the new statue’s safety is far from guaranteed.

 
 
Click here to subscribe.
 

Another backer, Patriarch Ignatius IV, the Lebanon-based head of the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch and All the East, died in 2012. He had donated the land for the statue, according to church official Bishop Ghattas Hazim.

By 2012, the statue was ready, but Syria was aflame, causing the project’s biggest delay, al-Ghadban said.

Majority Sunni Muslims dominate the revolt, and jihadists make up some of the strongest fighting groups. Other Muslim groups along with the 10-percent Christian minority have stood largely with Assad’s government, or remained neutral, sometimes arming themselves to keep hard-line rebels out of their communities.

Churches have been vandalized, priests abducted. Last month the extremists overran Maaloula, a Christian-majority town so old that some of its people still speak a language from Jesus’ time.

On Tuesday a militant Muslim cleric, Sheik Omar al-Gharba, posted a YouTube video of himself smashing a blue-and-white statue of the Virgin Mary.

Al-Ghadban and the project’s most important backer, Gavrilov, weighed canceling it.

They consulted Syria’s Greek Orthodox Patriarch John Yaziji. It was he who told them “Jesus would have done it.”

They began shipping the statue from Armenia to Lebanon. In August, while it was en route, Gavrilov, 49, suffered a fatal heart attack, al-Ghadban said.

Eventually the statue reached Syria.

“It was a miracle,” al-Ghadban said. “Nobody who participated in this expected this to succeed.”

___

Associated Press writers Raphael Satter in London and Albert Aji in Damascus contributed to this report.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Original Post –http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/amid-syrias-civil-war-a-40-foot-statue-of-jesus-rises-on-mountain-top-between-front-lines/2013/11/02/39f0eabe-43bd-11e3-b028-de922d7a3f47_story_1.html

 

BEIRUT – A suicide bomber driving a truck packed with 1.5 metric tons of explosives killed at least 30 people and wounded dozens in Syria’s central city of Hama on Sunday, state media reported.

The man blew himself up inside the vehicle on a busy road on the outskirts of the city, the SANA agency said.

It blamed the attack on “terrorists”, the term it uses to describe rebel forces trying to topple President Bashar al-Assad.

The pro-opposition Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the attack targeted an army checkpoint.

Syria’s 2-1/2-year old conflict began as peaceful protests but has degenerated into civil war.

Rebels have been joined by hardline Islamists, some of them linked to al Qaeda, and several groups have used suicide bombs to attack military and political targets.

Pictures on Syria TV showed firemen trying to put out huge fires and black clouds of smoke rising from charred trucks and cars. 

Original Post-http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/20/21049361-suicide-bomb-in-hama-syria-kills-30-wounds-dozens-state-media?lite=